Last edited by Nern
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of The literacy of the laity in the Middle Ages. found in the catalog.

The literacy of the laity in the Middle Ages.

James Westfall Thompson

The literacy of the laity in the Middle Ages.

by James Westfall Thompson

  • 353 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by B. Franklin in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Education, Medieval

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    SeriesBurt Franklin research and source works series #2
    The Physical Object
    Pagination198 p.
    Number of Pages198
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23375102M

      'Most studies of early medieval literacy have emphasised the role of the Church in the production of written documents. This collection puts the spotlight on the involvement of the laity, and vividly reveals the extent to which laymen played an active role in documentary culture throughout the post-Roman World, from the Eastern Mediterranean to Anglo-Saxon England/5(4). There has been a link between spirituality and learning throughout the Middle Ages, from the first monastic schools, to the rise of the cathedral schools and finally with the development of universities. There are differences between monasticism and scholasticism but there are also movements where these two perspectives converge. In this paper I will provide an overview of monasticism and.

    Literacy's importance in early medieval Europe is examined in the context of the significance, implications and consequences for Ireland, Anglo-Saxon England, Visigothic and Umayyad Spain, Papal Rome, and Byzantium, between c. and c. /5. Russell Shaw. "The Laity from Apostolic Times through the Middle Ages." Chapter 1 of Catholic Laity in the Mission of the Church: Living Out Your Lay Vocation (Chilliwack, BC: The Chartwell Press, ). Reprinted by permission of the author. The Author. Russell Shaw is a contributing editor of Our Sunday Visitor Newsweekly magazine. He was the.

      Literacy and the papal government in late antiquity and the early middle ages Thomas F. X. Noble; 5. Literacy and the laity in early mediaeval Spain Roger Collins; 6. Aspects of mediaeval Jewish literacy Stefan C. Reif; :   Review 'Most studies of early medieval literacy have emphasised the role of the Church in the production of written documents. This collection puts the spotlight on the involvement of the laity, and vividly reveals the extent to which laymen played an active role in documentary culture throughout the post-Roman World, from the Eastern Mediterranean to Anglo-Saxon : Adam Kosto Edited by Warren Brown, Marios Costambeys, Matthew Innes.


Share this book
You might also like
Khmer court dance

Khmer court dance

Workshop on Small Farmers and Agricultural Labour, 17-18 July 1970

Workshop on Small Farmers and Agricultural Labour, 17-18 July 1970

Gender focused rapid response teams

Gender focused rapid response teams

1978 census of agriculture, preliminary report, Buckingham County, Va.

1978 census of agriculture, preliminary report, Buckingham County, Va.

Negotiation within domination

Negotiation within domination

An essay on man.

An essay on man.

The path not taken

The path not taken

Harrell V. Noble papers

Harrell V. Noble papers

Intruders in the night

Intruders in the night

Glimpses of Indian wisdom.

Glimpses of Indian wisdom.

Grisha Bruskin. Modern Archeology

Grisha Bruskin. Modern Archeology

Y ddau bren

Y ddau bren

The literacy of the laity in the Middle Ages by James Westfall Thompson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Literacy Of The Laity In The Middle Ages [Thompson, James Westfall] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Literacy Of The Laity In The Middle AgesAuthor: James Westfall Thompson.

Literacy during the Middle Ages may be measured almost wholly by the extent of the knowledge and use of the Latin language. Among many problems in the history of medieval culture one of the most obscure is the question of how extensively and how deeply a knowledge of Latin obtained among the laity.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Thompson, James Westfall, Literacy of the laity in the Middle Ages. New York, B.

Franklin, ‘Most studies of early medieval literacy have emphasised the role of the Church in the production of written documents. This collection puts the spotlight on the involvement of the laity, and vividly reveals the extent to which laymen played an active role in documentary culture throughout the post-Roman World, from the Eastern Mediterranean to Anglo-Saxon England.

Full text of "The Literacy Of The Laity In The Middle Ages" See other formats. The Literacy Of The Laity In The Middle Ages: University Of California Publications In Education, V9 [Thompson, James Westfall, Jones, Harold E., Richardson, Leon J.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Literacy Of The Laity In The Middle Ages: University Of California Publications In Education, V9Author: James Westfall Thompson.

(London, ); the more recent representatives of the simplistic view that literacy was confined to the clergy are, in part, answered by James Westfall Thompson, The Literacy of the Laity in the Middle Ages, University of California Publications in Education 9 (Berkeley, ; repr.

New York, ). Introduction. There is no doubt that in Italy in the later Middle Ages there existed a large class of educated professionals, with a good knowledge of Latin. [1] But there is still much controversy about the exact level of education and literacy amongst the laity in this period.

The Literacy Of The Laity In The Middle Ages by James Westfall Thompson. Publication date Publisher Burt Franklin Collection universallibrary Contributor Universal Digital Library Language English. Addeddate Barcode Call number Digitalpublicationdate The book investigates the ways in which literacy was important in early medieval Europe, and examines the context of literacy, its uses, levels, and distribution, in a number of different early medieval societies, including Ireland, Anglo-Saxon England, Visigothic and Umayyad Spain, Papal Rome, and Byzantium, between c.

and c. The contributors set out to provide the factual basis for /5(2). In this book, a series of tightly linked essays reveals for the first time the extent of their use and preservation by the laity in post-Roman Europe, North Africa and Egypt.

Review 'Most studies of early medieval literacy have emphasised the role of the Church in the production of written cturer: Cambridge University Press.

The 14th and 15th centuries saw a proliferation of a work which the laity could use themselves for their daily ritual.

This was the book of hours. This was the most widely produced class of book of the late middle ages, was the book most likely to be owned by a person of modest means, and was significant in the development of lay literacy. James Westfall Thompson (–) was an American historian specializing in the history of medieval and early modern Europe, particularly of the Holy Roman Empire and also made noteworthy contributions to the history of literacy, libraries and the book trade in the Middle Ages.

Born to a Dutch reform minister's family in Pella, Iowa, Thompson received an undergraduate degree. It depends. The number one requirement for literacy is something to write on. The 26 letters of the Roman alphabet (or 29, if you are a Finn) are not that difficult to learn.

The big issue is to have something to write on and to read. The Romans h. There is a vigorous debate in the scholarly literature on the subject of lay literacy, but from our list here see Parkesalso Clanchyalso de Hamel also Bischoff There is information about a research project on the relationships between written, oral and non-verbal communication at the website Communication in the Earlier Middle Ages.

the laity lead good lives. In the Middle Ages, as today, there was a wide range of literate and il­ literate population. Illiteracy today and then was often hidden and no­ tions of literacy vague. Michael Clanchy demonstrates how clericus and litteratus, laicus and illitteratus are interchangeable terms in the early Mid­ dle Ages( Question 4: In the Middle Ages there was an increase in the percentage of women who could read and write.

Give as many reasons as you can for this. Question 5: Was the growth in literacy during the Middle Ages an example of "rapid" or "gradual" change. Answer Commentary. A commentary on these questions can be found here. It not surprising that the development of the internet and related electronic technologies has coincided with an academic interest in the history of reading.

Using and transmitting texts in new ways, scholars have become increasingly aware of the precise ways in which manuscripts and printed books transmitted texts to early modern readers.

This volume collects nine essays on reading and. In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or medieval period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire and merged into the Renaissance and the Age of Middle Ages is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period.

In the Middle Ages, there was virtually no literacy in Europe except within the Church societies. Really, this was not much of a significant change from the ancient world since most people in the ancient world had little use for written materials.

Anything of value for your occupation was transmitted orally from master to apprentice. W. Thompson, The Literacy of the Laity in the Middle Ages (Berkeley, Calif., ); Malcolm B. Parkes, "The Literacy of the Laity," in The Medieval World, vol.

2, Literature and Western Civilization, ed. David Daiches and Anthony Thorlby (London, ), ; J. Hoeppner Moran, "Literacy and Education in Northern England, A.This book contains essays written over the past 25 years about medieval urban communities and about the loyalties and beliefs of medieval lay people in general.

Most writing about medieval religious, political, legal, and social ideas starts from treatises written by academics and assumes that ideas trickled down from the clergy to the laity. Editorial Reviews "Most studies of early medieval literacy have emphasised the role of the Church in the production of written documents.

This collection puts the spotlight on the involvement of the laity, and vividly reveals the extent to which laymen played an active role in documentary culture throughout the post-Roman World, from the Eastern Mediterranean to Anglo-Saxon :